Welcome reader to my blog - a mixture of this and that. Now that we are living in a retirement community in downtown Columbia, MD my personal gardening activities are somewhat curtailed. I still enjoy visiting gardens, reading, watching wildlife on my walks, traveling, and occasional food commentary. Please leave a comment if you feel inspired to do so. I read every one of them.

Friday, January 15, 2016

Johnstown Flood Museum

Johnstown, Pa experienced a catastrophic flood in 1889.
You can read more about it here on Wikipedia

We visited the Museum which is housed in the library donated by Andrew Carnegie since the first one was destroyed by the flood. 

 It's interesting to note that Carnegie was a member of the club that vacationed at the lake resort, yet no member of that resort was ever held liable for the flood even though they owned and maintained the dam.


The third floor of the library was used as a gym and even had a track for walking around the perimeter near the ceiling.



From the windows of the museum you can see the bridge (replaced after the flood) where all the debris washed down and caught up.  Eventually this burst into flames killing people who may have otherwise been saved.


The second floor has a theatre where you can view a documentary about the flood and view photos from that time period.


Here are photos of the flood damage featured on the first floor of the museum.











There is a recreation of the debris that piled up at the bridge.


And then some of the articles of clothing and household wares that survived the flood.  Some of the owners of these were identified.


The diorama helps you picture the distance the flood waters traveled and how they gained such speed and depth roaring through the twists and turns of the valleys.  Johnstown sits in a flood plain there in the foreground.



 It's quite a moving exhibit.  Worth the visit if you are ever in that part of Pennsylvania.










7 comments:

Margaret Adamson said...

thanks for sharing this interesting post

Tom said...

tragic event, the rich washed out the poor...the American way

Cranberry Morning said...

We have been there and isn't it fascinating!! Very sad story.

You asked me about Foyle's War. (Your email doesn't appear with your comment so I'm answering you here.) Yes, we've watched them all and own several seasons on DVD. It's among my favorites. I love Michael Kitchen. (Have you seen him in The Guilty). We've also recently discovered the newest ones I think on Acorn, but have a couple more to watch. They are incredibly good. Anthony Horowitz is an amazing writer.

amanda | wildly simple said...

I love those doors in the first photo. This looks like a great museum for preserving and sharing the history of what this place and people went through. It's incredible the damages water can do, something Beau and I are studying in third grade science right now.

amanda | wildly simple said...

I love those doors in the first photo. This looks like a great museum for preserving and sharing the history of what this place and people went through. It's incredible the damages water can do, something Beau and I are studying in third grade science right now.

Rhapsody said...

Blessings.....
Water, life sustaining can also be destructive. Gives one pause its the dual complexity yet we all (human beings) have the same dual complexity. I guess its the ying and yang of things.

thanks for sharing
peace.
Rhapsody
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Public Historian said...

Hello Marcia:
Thank you so very much for visiting the Johnstown Flood Museum and sharing your visit with others. We do appreciate your kind words about our exhibitions and historic building. For more information about our museum and other historic sites in Johnstown, please visit www.jaha.org.

Thank you,
Kaytlin
Curator, Johnstown Area Heritage Association

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